Monday, October 18, 2010

A Harvest Ending

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Our raisins have been shaken. They are dumped from their bin into the shaker where a crew sorts through them to help get out all the stems, leaves, and z grade raisins.

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A bin of raisins that will go to market.

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Roger and our Foreman Lupe looking at the z grade raisins. These will be sold either to distillery or for cow feed.

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This is a bin full of all the stems and leaves that will be dumped into the vineyard and be disk  under. We will also use some for our garden compost.

We deliver our raisins to Sunmaid which we are members of. I will have to explain from memory what happens when they are delivered. It has been a few year sense I have gone. When you get to Sunmaid you pull up to the scale house where you exit the truck and they weigh the truck. You are given a number that you write on your bins with chalk. This number follows you raisins through each step so if a problem is found they are able to track where it came from. Then you get in line to have your bins inspected by the USDA. They pull a few bins off of the truck and an inspector test and looks through the bin. If you pass you are sent over to have your truck unloaded. Then you head back to the scale to weigh your empty truck. You are payed by the tonnage and your payment is spread out over three years. After leaving the raisins they go though some serious cleaning and then are shipped all over the world. After harvest the vines are given a good drink of water. The vines will soon start to loose their leaves and go dorment for the winter. We will prune the vines in January for the next years harvest. The best part is when your check for the harvest comes in the mail! We are truly blessed to have this vineyard and thank you Lord for always providing for our family! Amen!

I am Happy,

Sarah

3 comments:

  1. Sarah,

    I have enjoyed your posts about the raisins. It has been interesting and I have learned from it.

    Thanks for sharing. Have a great day with your family.

    ~Cheryl

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  2. I loved your post! Very interesting. I have never thought about where raisins actually came from before. I let my oldest read this too. He thought it was neat...so thanks for a teaching moment :)

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  3. thanks for this post...gives raisins a home..knew they were originally grapes..but did not vision them on a farm..weird I know

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